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No One Is Who They Seem. Not Even You

A Pig in Pandora’s Box.


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Rachel Leah Blumenthal

Ten is now more than a number; it is taking on an entirely new meaning. An indie movie making its mark, Ten held its Premier Screenings on March 28 at the Brooklyn Girl Film Festival in Brooklyn, NY and March 30 at the Boston Underground Film Festival in Cambridge, MA.

Creator Sophia Cacciola says, "There are many movies in which ensemble casts of men or ensemble casts with a token woman or two perform, but there are virtually no movies with ensemble casts of women in non-gender-specific scenarios. Our goal with TEN was to create a film with a cast of women participating in action that has little to do with being a woman. In fact, with the exception of one character, the script would hardly need rewriting if it were all men. The movie is not really about ten women, so much as it is about ten characters who happen to be women."

An eclectic group of ten women somehow finds itself in a haunted mansion on Spektor Island. The women come from all walks of life. From a religious zealot, to a doctor, their careers and personalities are all encompassing. In fact, both the cast and crew boast a very varied, unique and open set of people, including women from the LGBT Community.

What makes this movie stand out?  It’s a slasher flick, and so much more. There is the play on identity as there is more than meets the eye for each and every one of them. Appearances can be – and are – deceiving. Deeper still, the movie takes on a political and sociological stance, examining stereotypes, identity, and also the subtext and themes behind story lines. It’s more of a psychological mystery than just your average, run of the mill slasher film.   

The cast includes Jade Sylvan, Molly Carlisle, Molly Devon, UnAmerika’s Sweetheart Karin Webb, Kerri Lynch, Leah Principe, Rachel Leah Blumenthal, Susannah Plaster, Porcelain Dalya, Sophia Cacciola, Kate True, and Phil Opitz.

Featured on Indie Wire, Ten was an Indie Wire Project of the Month for April, and was mentioned on Citywide Blackout and was even the subject of an article in The Boston Herald.  Ten promises to entertain you, challenge your ideas on stereotypes while also making your heart race in suspense.

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