Reviewed: Kiss Me

This sexy and authentic love story sets a new bar for lesbian films.


Published:

Photo credit: Rolf Konow

What is your favorite lesbian film? Loving Annabelle? But I'm a Cheerleader? Heavenly Creatures? They are all good movies, but there is an unfortunate trope among queer cinema: the gay character dies or is punished by the end of the film, the woman returns to her boyfriend instead of her lesbian lover. Barring that many lesbian films suffer from poor production values or is extraordinarily campy, saccarine or focuses so exclusively on the character sexuality that further character development and plot falls by the wayside. Fortunately, Kyss Mig (Kiss Me) is refreshingly free of all of these elements.

This Swedish romantic drama revolves around Frida (Liv Mjönes) and Mia (Ruth Vega Fernandez), both in their thirties, who first meet at their parents' engagement party, making them soon-to-be stepsisters. As the dynamics unfold between the melding families, Mia, who just announced the engagement to her boyfriend Tim, grows more and more fascinated by Frida and her free-spirited nature.

This storyline may sound familiar, but Kyss Mig sets the bar for quality queer cinema. That's because the script, cinematography, music, and acting are all exceptionally well done. Kyss Mig tears at the rawness of human emotion and portrays love with such authenticity, the love between a parent and a child, the love between a dying relationship and best of all, the love between Mia and Frida. Kyss Mig will make you laugh. It will make you cry, and it will warm your heart. Get ready to have a new favorite lesbian movie.

Watch the trailer below and get excited, in more than one way.

 

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