Finding Eve by Jill Huckelberry

Lilith and Eve would meet at the pool every day embracing each other and exploring one another’s bodies.


Published:

What if Adams first wife Lilith, had an affair with his second wife Eve? When Adam found out, he killed Lilith. God cursed both Eve and Lilith so that they would find each other again, century after century, and just when they found one another, one was destined to die. This would continue throughout time, until they can find a way to break the curse.

In the prologue, we find a frail old grandmother, telling her granddaughter a story, of her meeting a shaman many years ago,and why she believed the shaman told her she been cursed.

Then the reader is, taken back in time to France where the French Revolution is happening.The story continues with both Katherine and Anna, switching between the two main characters, each telling of their livesduring this era.

This time can they find a way to rid themselves of this curse and be able to love and live in peace?

The epilogue is nothing short of brilliant! That is for the reader to find out.

Jill Huckelberry the author of Finding Eve, has carefully researched eighteenth century France, with the Revolution period in history, it intertwines with fiction, romance, violence and at times it is heartbreaking.

Finding Eve is an imaginative twist on Adam, Eve and Lilith. Jill Huckelberry, debutante author has created a wonderful book; very well written; and as such, it really draws the reader in, unable to be put down until the last page is turned.

 

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Articles

Bright Lights of Summer by Lynn Ames

Bright Lights of Summer is a delightful and nostalgic tale that brings together the love of softball and a sweetheart romance set against the backdrop of the Second World War.


On My Way to Happy and Gay by Barbara Castle-Farmer

In this memoir, Barbara Castle-Farmer shares her journey to acceptance and understanding of self, starting in 1960s South Africa, at a time where LGBTI visibility was virtually non-existent.

The Palace Blues by Brandy T. Wilson

Soft butch Frankie falls hard for bluesy, ballsy Jean Bailey, a cross-dressing crooner who likes to muddy the Ethel Waters. But is this loose chanteuse just looking for a little sugar in her bowl?

Karen Campbell's "The Knowing"

Jen is a woman with a special gift that is rewarding yet emotionally draining.

Add your comment: