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Here’s Your Chance To See Lady Macbeth & Her Lover

Inspired by the lives of Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton and Elizabeth Bishop, this play is unmissable.


Published:

via The directors studio

 

A play about destiny and the power of passion and art, Lady Macbeth and Her Lover follows the intertwined lives of three women in their search for fame and love. Soul mates for life and beyond, lovers Hope and Corinne, both poets, make a suicide pact. One lives, and the other goes on to win the Pulitzer Prize, posthumously. Years later, the dead woman's daughter knocks on the survivor’s door, demanding that she be her literary mentor. Inspired by the lives of Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton and Elizabeth Bishop, Lady Macbeth and Her Lover is a psychological thriller that challenges and feeds the soul.

 

Lady Macbeth and Her Lover is running November 1st to November 19th in The Directors Studio at The Directors Company (311 West 43rd Street, Suite 409, Manhattan, NY).

Tickets and more info here, or via telephone at 212-868-4444.

 

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