Sabrina Matthews: Exclusive Interview


Published:

(page 2 of 2)

I want to talk about Los Angeles because it seems like such a superficial place, and I know you have lived there for seven years and you joke about it. Is there room in L.A. for a woman like you?
There’s room but it has taken me a long time to find it. A lot of people say L.A. sucks and I said it for a long time, [but] there are a lot of really great things in Los Angeles, there are a lot of truly talented deeply interesting people. And it’s not everyone, [laughs] you can watch television or go to a movie and say, “Oh that person has no talent,” and you may well be absolutely right. But you can never say those people are lazy. Nobody who has acquired a modicum of fame is lazy in the slightest. What I discovered in L.A. is, I really want to be a rogue comic, and so I am a rogue comic who happens to live in L.A. Like being on Kightlinger’s show or taping something for Comedy Central. That all comes because of the people who happen to know me, not because I go out and bust ass. There are some people who really bust ass, like Sarah Silverman when I used to see a lot of her. Everywhere I went she was there. There’s a reason there’s a Sarah Silverman Show, and it’s not because she sat at home watching CSI reruns and eating Chinese food.

Who would do that?
No one. I’m not.

What about the lesbian community?
I am completely mystified by the lesbian community in Los Angeles, and I have always been, and I won’t always be in Los Angeles. I want to go somewhere where I am interesting and cute, instead of weird and fat. Everything seems to be so defined. You’re a feminine woman who wants to be with a feminine woman who is exactly like you. I see these couples and I think, What do they say to each other? I love me and I love me too? It is so prevalent, and then there’s a lot of very butch-femme couples. I have heard so many women say that butch on butch couples are disgusting, revolting. I have heard these words used. Also, the definition of butch is hilarious to me, like the butch women in L.A. are androgynous in other places I’ve lived. I kind of like androgyny, so I’ll see a woman who I think is androgynous and I’ll be like, Oh, she’s kind of hot. And someone will be like, Oh, you can’t, what are you talking about? Butch on butch action, that’s gross. Butch on butch action? Who the hell is the other butch?

Do you think gay and lesbian comedy is progressing and where do you think it’s going to be in five, 10, 15 years?
Well I think its really going to turn. I have been thinking about the gay marriage thing recently, and I’ll get to that in a second, but my answer kind of turns on that. I think that advancements are made, sort of social advancements are made in two ways. Either something huge happens and then people recover from it, in whatever way that changes their reality, or there is that kind of constant creeping forward of a group.

I would say that having openly gay comics do half hour comedy shows, and having shows on television where there are gay comics or gay characters—I would say those are huge things. And people—Joe Schmoe who lives in Idaho—people are going to decide what they are going to think about that. And there is the constant creep of, you know, there’s a gay comic at your local comedy club every so often, or your newspaper reports on gay marriage. If gay people get [the right to get] married, that’s going to be a huge thing. In five years I think we are going to be a little bit further along than we are now. But right now, maybe every season there’s another gay character on television. Now we’re in the slow, creep phase. That’s the reaction to the big, jump phase, because gay people were the flavor of the month about 10 years ago. It’s definitely a political thing as well. Five years ago, I think that the gay community became silent and now we’re starting to get it again. We had all these rights, we opened the closet in a lot of respects, but then [now that] we have these rights we don’t have to fight anymore. And now that our rights are being slowly taken away from us again, now we are doing less of a creep and more of a jump.
 

 

Related Articles

Sofia - Perfect Storm

Simply Beautiful....Sofia the Wise.

Twilight Girl by Della Martin

She can dream all she wants, but Lon Harris has no idea where her dreams will take her...

Surf’s Up!

Brazil Ecojourneys and GaySurfers host South America’s only LGBT surf camp.

Not So GLAAD In Hollywood

GLAAD finds films that have been released by seven of the largest studios lack LGBT images with offensive content.

Add your comment: