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Lesbian Reality Televison Q&A Round up

(page 5 of 12)

Exclusive Interview with Paula From TV Land's She's Got the Look

Written by: Colleen M. Lee

Flirtatious, statuesque and a bit intimidating, TV Land’s She’s Got the Look reality contestant Paula may have been voted off the show, but she still wants to represent African American lesbians. Discussing dating, the down-low and when she realized she was gay (it was earlier than you might expect), Paula shows off a softer side.

How did you get involved in the show?

Someone told me, they are searching for models over 35. Why don’t you give it a try? I went and stood around for about six hours and grabbed my heels and I guess the rest is history.

What happened after the audition?

I [sat] in that parking lot in my truck and cried, it was so hot. They [then] called me and I ended up making it.

You drive a truck?

[Laughs.] I drive a truck.

You didn’t model before appearing on the show?

I’ve actually just started pursuing [modeling]. At no point did I ever think that I would get chosen, but I knew that I had a look. When they asked me that question, “Are you straight?” at that moment in time, I knew right then as I did when I was 3 years old. I knew I wasn’t going to deny it. And so it just came easy for me to say “No.”

There has been a lot of talk in the media about African American men being on the “down-low.” Does this happen with African American women?

Yes, it does and that bothers me. There’s so many other things going on in the world and I believe people are going to talk about you whether you are gay or straight. Why not just go with what you know? I knew at 3 years old.

So do you think that it’s going to be more difficult booking gigs being a lesbian woman of color?

I think, all this time, that society has closed a lot of doors in my face, but I think that I wasn’t ready, as far as knowing how to place myself and stand up for myself. So some say, “Oh, she’s an angry black woman.” No. I’m not an angry black woman, I [am] not afraid to expose what I feel. [It would be] an injustice for all the women who are fighting to stand up for what they are. So when you see me you just see a woman who’s been through some things and is not afraid to share those things.

In one of show’s scenes, you all share secrets with each other. Were you comfortable talking about your childhood?

Yeah, it came easy for me. Being an African American woman in America and being a lesbian and all the judgments that I’ve been through, it was important that I release that.

So do you feel that most of the women had a big issue with you being a lesbian at first, and did that change after they got to know you?

I think with the maturity factor, being 35 and over, they didn’t have a problem with me at all. As a matter of fact, they were really intrigued.

The show stretches the boundaries of age and beauty. How do you view your beauty?

I left home at 15. I went to school. I stayed in a hotel for two years. I didn’t go to jail. I didn’t do drugs. I played basketball. I graduated. I put myself through college, with no parental supervision. [My experience] made me a stronger, defiant person. I decided I wasn’t going to fake the funk.

Here’s the all-important question—are you dating?

After the show, my status has gone up, as far as exposure. I love the attention. I’m dating, but I don’t have anything serious at the moment.

So you’re a multiple dater?

Well, no, you know? [Laughs.] I do go out. I seem like a player, right?

Right.

No, I like to take it slow. It’s my age. I love the exposure and having the opportunity to meet so many women from around the world.

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